The Chicago 507 (47mm)
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The Chicago 507 (47mm)

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The Chicago 507 (47mm)
The Chicago 507 (47mm)
The Chicago 507 (47mm)
The Chicago 507 (47mm)
The Chicago 507 (47mm)
The Chicago 507 (47mm)
The Chicago 507 (47mm)
The Chicago 507 (47mm)
The Chicago 507 (47mm)
The Chicago 507 (47mm)

Watch Description

What makes the Chicago 507 unique: Today, we’re incredibly pleased to present this stunningly unique antique watch that was initially manufactured by the Elgin National Watch Company — the Chicago 507. This watch features a striking face, with a single-sunk, cream-colored dial boasting stylish black numerals and a subtle center pattern. The dial also features dark teal spade & whip hands and a helpful subdial. We matched this handsome pocket watch with our gorgeous and powerful Blued Titanium case that complements the dial’s color palette, and we topped it off with a nickel-plated crown. In addition to style, our Blued Titanium case also features a transparent back, enabling you to view the watch's historic 384-grade open-face movement with a going barrel, Moseley regulator, and Breguet hairspring. The watch’s rear also showcases sumptuous-looking gold-plated gears and 17 screw-set ruby and sapphire jewels throughout its ¾ plate. To tie the piece together, we equipped it with our splendid, hand-crafted Cordovan Oxblood leather watch strap, making this one-of-a-kind piece even more special.

The Elgin National Watch Company originally produced the Chicago 507’s pocket watch in Elgin, Illinois, in 1921 — the same year that the famous American Cowboy Nat Love died. Love was born as a slave on a Tennessee plantation in 1854. After the abolition of slavery, he began working on a farm, where he became incredibly skilled at breaking horses. At age 16, Nat Love traveled to the Western United States and found work as a cowboy at the Duval Ranch along the Palo Duro River in Texas. There, he became a talented marksman. Much of Love’s exploits are detailed in his autobiography Dead Wood Dick, including his meeting of Billy the Kid, Pat Garrett, and other famous western figures. One adventure he detailed in his book involved being captured by a group of Pima Native Americans while working rounding up cattle in Arizona in 1877. He claimed that he was shot many times before being captured but that the group nursed him back to health because of their respect for his heritage. Supposedly, the group wanted Love to stay within their tribe and marry the chief’s daughter, but Nat Love escaped by stealing one of their horses. Although many of Love’s adventures aren’t corroborated and could be fictional, he left his mark with his famous autobiography, which inspired many pop culture works depicting his adventures, including The Cherokee Kid and the 2021 film The Harder They Fall.

Movement Manufacturer Information

The movement inside of this watch was made by Elgin Watch Company. We call this model "The Chicago" because of the company's proximity to the city.

Also known as Elgin National Watch Company, Elgin wasn't only the largest watch manufacturer in the United States, but the largest watch manufacturer in the world for almost 100 years, operating from 1864-1964. The company often used a depiction of father time on advertisements. At one point, the company was making 7,500 watch movements per week and had 2,300 employees. The factory was demolished in 1966 and replaced with a shopping center.

Watch Specifications

  • Manufacturer: Vortic Watch Company
  • Warranty: Full 1-Year Warranty
  • Case Dimensions:
    • Diameter: 47mm
    • Thickness: 12mm
    • Lug to Lug: 55mm
    • Lug Width: 22mm
  • Case Material: Sandblasted Titanium
  • Crown/Hardware: Nickel Plated
  • Water Resistance: 1 ATM
  • Crystals: Sapphire
  • Case Back: Stainless Steel
  • Strap: Leather

Movement

  • Manufacturer: Elgin Watch Company
  • Serial Number: 24037498
  • Manufacture Year: 1921
  • Function: Manual Wind
  • Jewels: 17 Jewels
  • Hands: Original
  • Size: 12s
  • Power Reserve: ~36 Hours
What makes the Chicago 507 unique: Today, we’re incredibly pleased to present this stunningly unique antique watch that was initially manufactured by the Elgin National Watch Company — the Chicago 507. This watch features a striking face, with a single-sunk, cream-colored dial boasting stylish black numerals and a subtle center pattern. The dial also features dark teal spade & whip hands and a helpful subdial. We matched this handsome pocket watch with our gorgeous and powerful Blued Titanium case that complements the dial’s color palette, and we topped it off with a nickel-plated crown. In addition to style, our Blued Titanium case also features a transparent back, enabling you to view the watch's historic 384-grade open-face movement with a going barrel, Moseley regulator, and Breguet hairspring. The watch’s rear also showcases sumptuous-looking gold-plated gears and 17 screw-set ruby and sapphire jewels throughout its ¾ plate. To tie the piece together, we equipped it with our splendid, hand-crafted Cordovan Oxblood leather watch strap, making this one-of-a-kind piece even more special.

The Elgin National Watch Company originally produced the Chicago 507’s pocket watch in Elgin, Illinois, in 1921 — the same year that the famous American Cowboy Nat Love died. Love was born as a slave on a Tennessee plantation in 1854. After the abolition of slavery, he began working on a farm, where he became incredibly skilled at breaking horses. At age 16, Nat Love traveled to the Western United States and found work as a cowboy at the Duval Ranch along the Palo Duro River in Texas. There, he became a talented marksman. Much of Love’s exploits are detailed in his autobiography Dead Wood Dick, including his meeting of Billy the Kid, Pat Garrett, and other famous western figures. One adventure he detailed in his book involved being captured by a group of Pima Native Americans while working rounding up cattle in Arizona in 1877. He claimed that he was shot many times before being captured but that the group nursed him back to health because of their respect for his heritage. Supposedly, the group wanted Love to stay within their tribe and marry the chief’s daughter, but Nat Love escaped by stealing one of their horses. Although many of Love’s adventures aren’t corroborated and could be fictional, he left his mark with his famous autobiography, which inspired many pop culture works depicting his adventures, including The Cherokee Kid and the 2021 film The Harder They Fall.

The Movement

The Story

The Strap

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