Did you see us on TV? "David & Goliath - Hamilton vs Vortic"



National News!

"David & Goliath - Hamilton vs Vortic"

Jon Scott from the Fox News flew out from New York City this week to get the full story. He tried to fit it all in four minutes. We're extremely excited about how it turned out! 

We are receiving a lot of media requests and have several other interviews that we'll share with you next week! The story is coming out and being heard!

 

The Weekly Roundup

We build a new, one of a kind wristwatch every single day. We call it the Watch of the Day! Here's the last seven watches in your weekly round up. Click the images to see that watch on the website, and to learn more.

As always, everything inside these watches is from an antique American pocket watch including the dial (face), hands, and movement (the entire mechanical mechanism). Feel free to respond to this email with questions or to request a custom project!

 
 

The Springfield 344

 
 
 

The silvery champagne tones of the ornate Illinois dial are balanced by the texture of the 3D raw titanium case. The knurled nickel crown mimics the dial's grooved design, while the purple Merlot strap makes the blue numbers pop. The Autocrat movement made in 1923 was an engineering feat for its time, as the grooved lines all match up despite being produced separately. That was also the same year the first Yankee Stadium opened its door in the Bronx, NYC.

 

The Lancaster Railroad 018

 
 
 

THIS IS THE FIRST LANCASTER MODEL WE HAVE DONE IN YEARS! This watch features a Hamilton movement and dial upcycled into our DLC titanium case. (We are in no way affiliated with the Hamilton Watch Company). Despite being almost 100 years old, the crisp clean dial is undeniably modern and fresh. The rich, black leather straps, matte black DLC case, and bronze crown bring an understated elegance to this piece of history. The movement was made in 1926, the same year the restoration of Colonial Williamsburg began.

 

The Boston 224

 
 
 

This classic Waltham movement was produced in 1921, the year the first radio baseball game was broadcasted! We chose a simple and clean titanium case and nickel crown to allow the dial to be the star of the show. We paired it with our Cordovan Black strap, a very classy look. 

 

The Chicago 080

 
 
 

We love the texture added when we case a movement and dial in our 3D bronzed titanium like we did with this watch. Between the case, the gold crown and on-laid numerals, this watch has so much dimension and texture to it. The movement has 17 jewels and was produced by the Elgin National Watch Company in 1925.

 

The Chicago Railroad 017

 
 
 

This gorgeous Elgin Railroad watch is presented in our machined bronze case with the matching bronze crown. The numerals on the dial are bold and detailed with thick blue steel hands for easy reading. Naturally, we paired this watch with a Cordovan Oxblood strap for an upscaled look but we would recommended grabbing an extra strap to switch out for more casual looks! 

The Springfield 325

 
 
 

Our machined titanium with bronzed finish case was a no brainer with the beautiful accents in the center of the dial as well as the patina around the dial! Each movement and dial is unique piece of history and this dial obviously has a story to tell. Manufactured in 1923 and to lend some context, this was the year the Hollywood Sign was inaugurated in California! We could see this watch on someone like a John Barrymore from that time period.

 

The Chicago 300

 
 
 

The Chicago 300 has a rather unique style of dial with both the coloring and the numeral styles. The elegant golden dial features crisp black Roman Numerals, which are enhanced by the matte black DLC titanium case and Stout leather straps. We love the truly antique look of this dial, with the texture of the dial looking like an aged piece of parchment paper. The style of this dial almost gives us a pirate-like feel! The 17 jewel Elgin movement was produced in 1924, the same year The Wrigley Building in Chicago, Illinois was completed.⁠⠀


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